Author Archives: ingorohlfing

About ingorohlfing

I am Professor for Methods of Comparative Political Research at the Cologne Center for Comparative Politics at the University of Cologne (http://cccp.uni-koeln.de). My research interests are social science methods with an emphasis on case studies, multi-method research, and philosophy of science concerned with causation and causal inference. Substantively, I am working on party competition and parties as organizations.

The COMPASSS statement and QCA solution types

About two weeks ago, COMPASSS issued a Statement on Rejecting Article Submissions because of QCA Solution Type. In short, the reasoning was that methodological work on QCA is developing and that reviewers and editors should not judge empirical work based … Continue reading

Posted in causal inference, causation, QCA, qualitative, Qualitative Comparative Analysis, regularity, set theory | Tagged , , , , , | 14 Comments

The relevance of Political Science: Some thoughts on the recent critique

The charge that Political Science (or other non-STEM disciplines) is lacking relevance and does not produce interesting research is made then and again, with two new pieces published these days. One is written by a political economist, stating that most … Continue reading

Posted in political science, publishing, science, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Review of ‘Multi-Method Social Science’ (Seawright, CUP) – Chapter 2: Causation as A Shared Standard

Continuing the chapter-by-chapter review of Seawright’s book on Multi-Method Social Science took me longer than I imagined and it should have, but here we go again. The second chapter discusses the fundamentals of multimethod research (MMR) and identifies “Causation as … Continue reading

Posted in book review, causal inference, causation, mixed methods research, multimethod research, nested analysis, process tracing, qualitative, quantitative | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Review of “Multi-Method Social Science” (Seawright, CUP): Chapter 1

Review of the first chapter of the book “Multi-Method Social Science” by Jason Seawright, published with Cambridge University Press in 2016. Continue reading

Posted in book review, case study, mixed methods research, multimethod research, nested analysis, process tracing, qualitative, quantitative | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

People require preregistration, not methods

Many APSA 2016 panels and discussions in the Section on Qualitative and Multimethod Research and the Political Methodology Section were centered on the Data Access and Research Transparency (DART) Initiative (probably worth a blog post of its own). Even panels … Continue reading

Posted in APSA, Bayesianism, dart, evidence, preregistration, process tracing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t conflate fuzzy set membership with cases in QCA

How to properly interpret consistency and coverage values in fuzzy-set QCA. Continue reading

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Curiosities of QCA: Fuzzy-set consistency

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is the method of choice for the analysis of set relations and has changed considerably and improved over the years. The more one delves into the method, however, the more things you (I, at least) stumble … Continue reading

Posted in QCA, qualitative, Qualitative Comparative Analysis, set relation, set theory | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment